Quotes

Categories:

Wisdom/Knowledge/Information/Data; Bias; Business; Communication; Conservative/Conservatism; Courage; Culture; Cynicism; Death; Democracy; Dissent; Education; Ethics/Morality; Feminism; Friendship; Geography&Geosophy; Government; History/Historians/Historiography; Joy; Knowledge Work; Language/ Semantics/ Meaning; Law; Leadership; Liberalism; Libraries; Life; Listening; Love; Male/Female; Maps; Manners; Marxism; Memory; Money; Nature; NegotiatingObjective/Subjective; The Other; Peace; Philosophy; Politics; Power; Republic; Research; Revolution; Science; Socialism;Society; Space & Time ; Tariff; Truth; War; Work ;& Writing

Wisdom/Knowledge/Information/Data

“ז יִרְאַת יְהוָה, רֵאשִׁית דָּעַת; חָכְמָה וּמוּסָר, אֱוִילִים בָּזוּ.  // The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge, but fools despise wisdom and instruction.” Proverbs 1:7

“The greatest wisdom not applied to action and behavior is meaningless data.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.194)

“So into the fray steps the age-old pursuit, philosophy. Philosophy is, etymologically, “love of wisdom”: the word comes from two ancient Greek roots,  philo, “love of,” and sophia, “wisdom.” Notice here a small point. It’s not knowledge of wisdom. It’s  love. Think about this for a moment. If you have an object of love, you embrace it; if you lack it, you pursue it. Philosophy at its best is not just a matter of filling our heads with new questions and deep knowledge. It’s also an enterprise of the heart. It is the passionate pursuit and wholehearted embracing of wisdom, or genuine insight about living. ” (Morris, Tom. If Aristotle Ran General Motors: The New Sour of Business. First ed. New York, New York: Henry Holt and Company, Inc., 1997. p.8)

“I think students with a purpose should receive at the hands of the librarians not merely advice as to consulting the catalogues; but counsel as to the authoritative works of information. I do not see how it is possible to fix ‘ to what point the expenses of such service may be legitimately charged to the public.’ I think that students who are engaged upon work tending to public  improvement should receive the utmost assistance; and the cost of such assistance is very properly a ‘charge on the public’; particularly is this of force in municipal and government libraries.” (Letter to Charles Harris Hastings, December 4, 1899. Librarian’s Letterbook No.2, f.650 [found in Library of Congress. (1956). Herbert Putnam 1861-1955: A memorial tribute. Washington D.C.: Library of Congress.])

“For a fact, after all, is an event that somebody has defined, has classified, and, above all, is an event that somebody has endowed with relevance. To be able to quantify, one has to have a concept first. One first has to abstract from the infinite welter of phenomena a specific aspect that one then can name and finally count.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.200)

“And perhaps in this is the whole difference; perhaps all the wisdom, and all truth, and all sincerity, are just compressed into that inappreciable moment of time in which we step over the threshold of the invisible.” (Spoken by Marlow in Conrad, J.  (2011). Heart of darkness: Complete, authoritative text with biographical, historical, and cultural contexts, critical history, and essays from contemporary critical perspectives (3rd ed.) R. C. Murfin (Ed.). Boston: Bedford-St. Martins. p.86-87)

“Before making a significant statement, know what you want to communicate or find out, and know what purpose this information will serve.” (Fisher. R, Uri, W. (2011). Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In. New York: Penguin Books. p.39)

 ἡ δὲ ἄνωθεν σοφία πρῶτον μὲν ἁγνή ἐστιν, ἔπειτα εἰρηνική, ἐπιεικής, εὐπειθής, μεστὴ ἐλέους καὶ καρπῶν ἀγαθῶν, [a]ἀδιάκριτος, ἀνυπόκριτος· // “But the wisdom that comes from heaven is first of all pure; then peace-loving, considerate, submissive, full of mercy and good fruit, impartial and sincere.” James 3:17

“We must clarify in order to understand, and we can only classify the unfamiliar in terms of the familiar.”  Skinner, Quentin. (1969). Meaning and Understanding in the History of IdeasHistory and Theory. 8(1), p.6.

“For though we have more empirical information at our disposal, we have not different or better minds; and it is, after all, the action of the mind upon facts that makes both philosophy and science- and, indeed, largely makes the ‘facts.’ (Lovejoy, Arthur O.. The Great Chain of Being: A study of the History of an Idea. (New York, Harper & Row [1960, c1936]), p.23

“Intelligence, imagination, and knowledge are essential resources, but only effectiveness converts them into results. By themselves, they only set limits to what can be attained.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.192)

“The private knowledge and private skills that are so useful in the classroom are insufficient in organizations.” (Pfeffer, J. (1992). Understanding power in organizations. California Management Review, 34(2), 35)

“Wisdom is located at the top of a hierarchy of types, types of content of the human mind. Descending from wisdom there are understanding, knowledge, information, and, at the bottom, data. Each of these includes the categories that fall below it- for example, there can be no wisdom without understanding and no understanding without knowledge.” (Ackoff, R.L.(1989). From Data to Wisdom. Journal of applied systems analysis, 16, 3.)

“‘Know thyself,’ the old prescription for wisdom, is almost impossibly difficult for mortal men. But everyone can follow the injunction ‘know thy time’ if he or she wants to, and be well on the road toward contribution and effectiveness.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.240)

“Much of the world’s accumulated wisdom has thus been acquired, not from the rigorous application of scientific research, but through the skillful intuitive imagining- or insight- of philosophers, prophets, statesmen, artists, and scientists.”(Wright, John K. “Terrae Incognitae: The Place of the Imagination in Geography.” Annals Of The Association Of American Geographers 37, no. 1 (March 1947): 6)

“The amount of information an individual can acquire in an instant or in a lifetime is finite, and miniscule compared with what the milieu presents; many questions are too complex to describe, let alone solve, in a practicable length of time. The horizons of knowledge are expanding faster than any person can keep up with. The proliferation of new sciences extends our powers of sense and thought, but their rigorous techniques and technical languages hamper communication; the common field of knowledge becomes a diminishing fraction of a total store.” (Lowenthal, David. “Geography, Experience, and Imagination: Towards a Geographical Epistemology.” Annals of the Association of American Geographers 51, no. 3 (1961): 243)

“‘Garbage in, garbage out’ is a useful warning, but sometimes you can’t tell the data are garbage until they have been used for a while.” (Monmonier, Mark S. How to Lie with Maps. 2nd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996. p.57)

Bias

“Indeed, laziness and lack of curiosity all too often are the most important source of bias.”(Monmonier, Mark S. How to Lie with Maps. 2nd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996. p.40)

Business

“people in organizations tend to be influenced by the ways they see others being rewarded. And when the rewards go to non-performance, to flattery, or to mere cleverness, the organization will soon decline into nonperformance, flattery, or cleverness.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.135)

“The executive who focuses on contribution also stimulates others to develop themselves, whether they are subordinates, colleagues, or superiors. He sets standards that are not personal but grounded in the requirements of the task. At the same time, they are demands for excellence. For they are demands for high aspiration, for ambitious goals, and for work of great impact.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.216)

“It is not necessary for a business to grow bigger; but it is necessary that it constantly grow better.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.22)

“Profit is not the explanation, cause, or rationale of business behavior and business decision, but rather the test of their validity.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.18)

“Overconfidence is most likely to occur when a party’s knowledge is limited.” (Bazerman, M. (1998). Judgment in Managerial Decision Making. New York: John Wiley & Sons. p. 135)

“Successful careers are not ‘planned.’ They are the careers of people who are prepared for the opportunity because they know their strengths, the way they work, and their values. For knowing where one belongs makes ordinary people – hardworking, competent, bud mediocre otherwise- into outstanding performers.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.224)

“If a person wants to be an executive- that is, if he wants to be considered responsible for his contribution- he has to concern himself with the usability of his “product”- that is, his knowledge.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.212)

“The man who focuses on efforts and who stresses his downward authority is a subordinate no matter how exalted his title and rank. But the man who focuses on contribution and who takes responsibility for results, no matter how junior, is in the most literal sense of the phrase, “top management.” He holds himself accountable for the performance of the whole.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.208)

“terms that appear mutually beneficial when advanced by one’s own side may seem disadvantageous when proposed by the other party, even if the terms of the proposal are equal.” (Bazerman, M. (1998). Judgment in Managerial Decision Making. New York: John Wiley & Sons. p. 129)

Communication

“Indeed the very magnitude and importance of the communications apparatus meant that in the future radicals would have to revise their analysis of the capitalist system, taking into account the fact that whoever controlled its cultural machinery might ultimately wield greater power than those who owned its banks and factories.” (Pells, Richard H . Radical Visions and American Dreams: Culture and Social Thought in the Depression Years. Urbana [u.a.] : University of Illinois Press, 1998. p.266)

Conservative/Conservatism

From a book review on Jonathan M. Schoenwald’s A Time for Choosing: The Rise of Modern American Conservatism: “For conservatives, politics has always been subsidiary to what Burke referred to as the unbought grace of life, and conservatives have continually warned against seeing in politics the route to salvation.” (Shapiro, E. S. (2004). Trivializing American Conservatism. Modern Age, 46(1), 147-150)

Courage

“Sometimes the bravest thing on earth was to sit through the night and feel the cold in your bones. Courage was not always a matter of yes or no. Sometimes it came in degrees, like the cold; sometimes you were very brave up to a point and then beyond that point you were not so brave. In certain situations you could do incredible things, you could advance toward enemy fire, but in other situations, which were not nearly so bad, you had trouble keeping your eyes open. Sometimes…the difference between courage and cowardice was was something small and stupid.” (O’Brien, Tim. The Things They Carried. New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books, 1991. pp. 166-167)

Culture

“The shift to a culture of sight and sound was of profound importance; it increased our self-awareness as a culture; it helped create a unity of response and action not previously possible; it made us more susceptible than ever to those who would mold culture and thought.” (Warren Susman, “The Culture of the Thirties,” in Culture as History: The Transformation of American Society in the Twentieth Century (New York: Pantheon, 1984) p.160)

Cynicism

The cynic knows the price of everything and the value of nothing. ~ Oscar Wilde

Death

“To this day I do not know what they mean when they call dead bodies beautiful. The ugliest man alive is an angel of beauty compared with the loveliest of the dead.” (Lewis, C.S.. Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life. Boston: Mariner Books, 1966. p. 20)

Democracy

Fowler referring to Pyle, “He didn’t even hear what I said; he was absorbed already in the dilemmas of democracy and the responsibilities of the West; he was determined- I learned that very soon- to do good, not to any individual person, but to a country, a continent, a world. Well, he was in his element now, with the whole universe to improve.”(Graham Greene. The Quiet American. New York: The Viking Press. 1956. p.13)

Dissent

“Occasionally, all of us allow our zeal to exceed our judgment, but such behavioral aberrations should not be a basis for curbing dissent – dissent is both the prerogative and the preservative of free men everywhere.” (McNamara, Robert S. Folder “M,” Personal Correspondence Files.) Found in: (McNamara, Robert S. (1995) In retrospect: the tragedy and lessons of Vietnam. New York : Times Books. p.257 )

Education

“We must remember that intelligence is not enough. Intelligence plus character- that is the goal of true education. The complete education gives one not only power of concentration, but worthy objectives upon which to concentrate.”  (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “The Purpose of Education.” In The Papers Of Martin Luther King, Jr.  V.1. editors, Ralph E. Luker, Penny A. Russell ; advisory editor, Louis R. Harlan. Berkeley : University of California Press, 1992. p.124)

“In those days a boy on the classical side officially did almost nothing but classics. I think this was wise; the greatest service we can do to education today is to teach fewer subjects. No one has time to do more than a very few things well before he is twenty, and when we force a boy to be a mediocrity in a dozen subjects we destroy his standards, perhaps for life.” (Lewis, C.S.. Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life. Boston: Mariner Books, 1966. pp. 112-113)

Ethics/Morality

“people tend to confuse what is personally beneficial with what is fair or moral.”(Bazerman, M. (1998). Judgment in Managerial Decision Making. New York: John Wiley & Sons. p. 2)

Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does. ~William James

Feminism

“To young girls and women across the country, I say: do not let others define you. Do not listen to anyone who says you have to vote a certain way or for a certain candidate because you’re a woman. That is not feminism. Feminism doesn’t shut down conversations or threaten women. It is not about ideology. It is not a weapon to wield against your political opponent. A feminist is a woman who lives the life she chooses and uses all her God-given gifts. And always remember that a leader is not born, but made. Choose leadership.” (Fiorina, Carly. (February 10, 2016). This campaign was always about citizenship—…. [Facebook Status Update])

Friendship

“They made me look ridiculous to myself and they made me laugh about it. And for that I will always be grateful to them, because anybody who does that for you is a true and great friend.” (Vincent, Norah.  Self-Made Man : One Woman’s Journey Into Manhood And Back Again. New York : Viking, 2006. p.61)

Geography&Geosophy

“In the course of field work or on a summer holiday we have all climbed a mountain and gazed over uninhabited and unfamiliar country. Behind us has lain the valley out of which we have come, the farm or ranch where we have sojourned. …In the contemplative mood that mountain tops induce, we have brooded over the view, speculated on the lay of the land, experienced a pleasurable sense of the mysterious- perhaps felt even a touch of the sinister. We have heard the Sirens’ voices.”(Wright, John K. “Terrae Incognitae: The Place of the Imagination in Geography..” Annals Of The Association Of American Geographers 37, no. 1 (March 1947): 2)

“There are two grades of geographical knowledge: knowledge of observed facts and knowledge derived by reasonable inference from observed facts…”(Wright, John K. “Terrae Incognitae: The Place of the Imagination in Geography..” Annals Of The Association Of American Geographers 37, no. 1 (March 1947): 3)

“Neither the world nor our pictures of it are identical with geography. Some aspects of geography are recondite, others abstruse, occult, or esoteric; conversely, there are many familiar features of things that geography scarcely considers. Beyond that of any other discipline, however, the subject matter of geography approximates the world of general discourse; the palpable present, the everyday life of man on earth, is seldom far from our professional concerns.” (Lowenthal, David. “Geography, Experience, and Imagination: Towards a Geographical Epistemology.” Annals of the Association of American Geographers 51, no. 3 (1961): 241) 

“If the picture of the world in our heads were not fairly consistent with the world outside, we should be unable to survive in any environment other than a mental hospital. And if our private milieus were not recognizably similar to one another ,we could never have constructed a common world view.” (Lowenthal, David. “Geography, Experience, and Imagination: Towards a Geographical Epistemology.” Annals of the Association of American Geographers 51, no. 3 (1961): 250) 

“Personal as well as geographic knowledge is a form of sequent occupance. Like a landscape or a living being, each private world has had a career in time, a history of its own.” (Lowenthal, David. “Geography, Experience, and Imagination: Towards a Geographical Epistemology.” Annals of the Association of American Geographers 51, no. 3 (1961): 258-9) 

Government

“Let us develop the resources of our land, call forth its powers, build up its institutions, promote all its great interests, and see whether we also, in our day and generation, may not perform something worthy to be remembered.”  (Daniel Webster, June 17, 1825, Speech Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Battle of Bunker Hill, Charlestown, Massachusetts)

“It is unfortunately none too well understood that, just as the State has no money of its own, so it has no power of its own. All the power it has is what society gives it, plus what it confiscates from time to time on one pretext or another; there is no other source from which State power can be drawn. Therefore every assumption of State power, whether by gift or seizure, leaves society with so much less power; there is never, nor can be, any strengthening of State power without a corresponding and roughly equivalent depletion of social power.”  (Nock, Albert Jay. Our Enemy, The State. New York: Arno Press & The New York Times, 1972. p.3-4)

“It is to be regretted that the rich and powerful too often bend the acts of government to their selfish purposes. Distinctions in society will always exist under every just government. Equality of talents, of education, or of wealth can not be produced by human institutions. In the full enjoyment of the gifts of Heaven and the fruits of superior industry, economy, and virtue, every man is equally entitled to protection by law; but when the laws undertake to add to these natural and just advantages artificial distinctions, to grant titles, gratuities, and exclusive privileges, to make the rich richer and the potent more powerful, the humble members of society — the farmers, mechanics, and laborers — who have neither the time nor the means of securing like favors to themselves, have a right to complain of the injustice of their government. There are no necessary evils in government. Its evils exist only in its abuses. If it would confine itself to equal protection, and, as Heaven does its rains, shower its favors alike on the high and the low, the rich and the poor, it would be an unqualified blessing.” (Jackson, Andrew. A compilation of the messages and papers of the presidents prepared under the direction of the Joint committee on printing, of the House and Senate, pursuant to an act of the Fifty-second Congress of the United States (with additions and encyclopedia index by private enterprise)New York : Bureau of national literature, inc., 1897. V.3.  p. 1153.)

“personal government is always personal government; the mode of its exercise is a matter of immediate political expediency, and is determined entirely by circumstances.”(Nock, Albert Jay. Our Enemy, The State. New York: Arno Press & The New York Times, 1972. p.11)

History/Historians/Historiography

“Any set of facts can be used to tell an infinite number of stories. Stories are just that, stories. These explanations could be told in any of thousands of different ways.” (Patterson, K., Grenny, J., McMillan, R, & Swiltzler, A. (2012). Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High. (2nd Ed.) New York: McGraw Hill. p.111)

“though the history of ideas is a history of trial-and-error, even the errors illuminate the peculiar nature, the cravings, the endowments, and the limitations fo the creature that falls into them, as well as the logic of the problems in reflection upon which they have arisen; and they may further serve to remind us that the fuling modes of thought of our own age, which some among us are prone to regard as clear and coherent and firmly grounded and final, are unlikely to appear in the eyes of posterity to have any of those attributes.” (Lovejoy, Arthur O.. The Great Chain of Being: A study of the History of an Idea. (New York, Harper & Row [1960, c1936]), p.23

“Intellectual historians who insist on viewing the past from the angle of those who lived it tend to be equally impatient with the claims of Marxists and Whigs to understand grand patterns of development, because such patterns may distort our understanding by imposing meanings different from those that ideas had historically.”(Kloppenberg, James T., “The Virtues of Liberalism: Christianity, Republicanism, and Ethics in Early American Political Discourse,” in The Virtues of Liberalism 1998, ed. James T. Kloppenberg (New York : Oxford University Press, 1998), 22)

“Hindsight can obscure as much as it illuminates.” (Grimsley, Mark. (1995). The hard hand of war: Union military policy toward southern civilians, 1861-1865. New York: Cambridge University Press. p.47)

“The past is not preserved for the historian as his private domain. Myth, memory, history- these are three alternative ways to capture and account for an allusive past, each with its own persuasive claim.” (Warren Susman, “The Culture of the Thirties,” in Culture as History: The Transformation of American Society in the Twentieth Century (New York: Pantheon, 1984) p.151)

“We must classify in order to understand, and we can only classify the unfamiliar in terms of the familiar.” Skinner, Quentin (1969). Meaning and Understanding in the History of Ideas.History and Theory, 8(1), p.6

From a book review on Sean Wilentz’s The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln: “They are daring us, you see, these fine historians with their big books: Take care of your democracy, they are saying, and decide for yourselves whether the society you live in will be decent, or not.” (Oakes, James. “The Ages of Jackson and the Rise of American Democracies.” Journal Of The Historical Society 6, no. 4 (December 2006): 500.)

“Memory is often the historian’s most postent ally.”(Warren Susman, “The Culture of the Thirties,” in Culture as History: The Transformation of American Society in the Twentieth Century (New York: Pantheon, 1984) p.151)

“There appears to be a curious difficulty about exercising reflective thought upon the actual nature of an institution into which one was born and one’s ancestors were born. One accepts it as one does the atmosphere; one’s practical adjustments to it are made by a kind of reflex. One seldom thinks about the air until one notices some change, favourable or unfavourable, and then one’s thought about it is special; on thinks about purer air, lighter air, heavier air, not about air. So it is with certain human institutions. We know that they exist, that they affect us in various ways, but we do not ask how they came to exist, or what their original intention was, or what primary function it is that they are actually fulfilling; and when they affect us so unvavourably that we rebel against them, we contemplate substituting nothing beyond some modification or variant of the same institution.” (Nock, Albert Jay. Our Enemy, The State. New York: Arno Press & The New York Times, 1972. p.30-31)

Joy

…”I call it Joy, which is here a technical term and must be sharply distinguished both from Happiness and Pleasure. Joy (in my sense) has indeed one characteristic, and one only, in common with them; the fact that anyone who has experienced it will want it again. Apart from that, and considered only in its quality, it might almost equally well be called a particular kind of unhappiness or grief. But then it is a kind we want. I doubt whether anyone who has tasted it would ever, if both were in his power, exchange it for all the pleasures in the world. But then Joy is never in our power and pleasure often is.” (Lewis, C.S.. Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life. Boston: Mariner Books, 1966. pp. 17-18)

Knowledge Work

“Even if employed full-time by the organization, fewer and fewer people are ‘subordinates’ – even if fairly low-level jobs. Increasingly they are knowledge workers.’ And knowledge workers are not subordinates; they are ‘associates.’ For, once beyond the apprentice stage, knowledge workers must know more about their job  than their boss does- or else they are no good at all. In fact, that they know more about their job than anybody else in the organization is part of the definition of knowledge workers.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.78)

Language/ Semantics/ Meaning

“Where the humanities differ from the sciences- where researchers also generally start with theses and stories- is that in the humanities, we work with a more fluid semantics. … scientists deploy a semantics in which words stand for real things rather than our ideas about things. In the humanities, words about even those things that we seem most certain about- such as ourselves- change as our ideas change. They change as our situatedness changes….. Such a semantics enables and thrives on a shiftiness in the meanings of things. Rather than reify, it ambiguates.” The spatial humanities: GIS and the future of humanities scholarship 2010. , eds. David J. Bodenhamer, J. Corrigan and Trevor M. Harris. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. p. 84

Law

“the belief in the possibility of a rule of law, of equal justice, of fundamental rights, and a free society – can easily survive the recognition that judges are not omniscient and may make mistakes about facts and that, in practice, absolute justice is never fully realized in any particular legal case. But the belief in the possibility of a rule of law, of justice, and of freedom, can hardly survive the acceptance of an epistemology which teaches that there are no objective facts.” (Popper, Karl (1963). Conjectures and Refutations: The Growth of Scientific Knowledge. London: [n.a.] p.5)

Leadership

“[Leadership] has little to do with ‘leadership qualities’ and even less to do with ‘charisma.’ It is mundane, unromantic, and boring. Its essence is performance.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.268)

“The buck stops here.” ~Harry Truman

“The foundation of effective leadership is thinking through the organization’s mission, defining it, and establishing it, clearly and visibly.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.270)

President Kennedy to Robert McNamara after the Bay of Pigs: “I’m grateful to you for your willingness to assume part of the responsibility. But I am the president. I did not have to do what all of you recommended. I did it. I am responsible, and I will not try to put part of the blame on you, or Eisenhower, or anyone else.” (McNamara. Robert S. (1995) In retrospect: the tragedy and lessons of Vietnam. New York : Times Books. p.26-27 )

“To trust a leader, it is not necessary to like him. Nor is it necessary to agree with him. Trust is the conviction that the leader means what he says. It is a belief in something very old-fashioned, called ‘integrity.’  A leader’s actions and a leader’s professed beliefs must be congruent, or at least compatible. Effective leadership- and again this is very old wisdom- is not based on being clever’ it is based primarily on being consistent.”  (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.271)

“Another way of getting things done is by developing a strongly shared vision or organizational culture. If people share a common set of goals, a common perspective on what to do and how to accomplish it, and a common vocabulary that allow them to coordinate their behavior, then command and hierarchical authority are of much less importance.” (Pfeffer, J. (1992). Understanding power in organizations. California Management Review, 34(2), 42)

“The manager who uses a position at the head of a major institution to become a public figure and to take leadership with respect to social problems, while the company or the university erodes through neglect, is not a statesman, but is irresponsible and false to his trust.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.58)

“management’s most critical need is for less irrelevant information.” (Ackoff, R.L.(1989). From Data to Wisdom. Journal of applied systems analysis, 16, 3.)

“One does not ‘manage’ people. The task is to lead people. And the goal is to make productive the specific strengths and knowledge of each individual.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.81)

Liberalism

“Our nation has flourished because we have not permitted those with power to silence those who challenged them, whether the former brandished dogmas of religion, race, ethnicity, gender, culture, or economics. Force, as Madison insisted, must never be the measure of right; we must not allow currently fashionable doctrines of selfishness to masquerade as virtue of rationality. We must instead recover a different set of ideals grounded not in fables but rooted in our history, which inspired earlier Americans to seek and, when necessary, to demand justice from those who tried to justify the inequalities that shielded their own privileges. We must recover the virtues of liberalism.”(Kloppenberg, James T. The Virtues of LiberalismNew York : Oxford University Press, 1998. p.4)

Libraries

“The primary elements of any library and of all libraries are just books, the people, and the librarians to bring them together.” (Wyer, Malcolm G. “Enduring Values.” Bulletin of the American Library Association 31, no. 7 (1937): p.381)

“There I discovered the value of reading: I found out I should read because I couldn’t not read. I read because each good reading experience gave me an even stronger motive to keep reading. I read without following manuals, card catalogs, guides, critical anthologies, books labeled “classics,” or recommendations for weekend reading. Books interested me so much because they were my only friends. I don’t know if I was happy then, but I do know that as I turned those dearly beloved pages I forgot my hunger and misery, and that saved me from resentment and fear.” (Báez, Fernando. (2008) A Universal History of the Destruction of Books. New York : Atlas & Co.: Distributed to the trade by W.W. Norton. p.4)

“The establishment of monastic libraries and their scriptoria in fact can be traced to the requirement, begun in the earliest monastic communities, that monks recite and memorize passages from texts collected and stored in the monastery.” (Peterson, H. A. (2010). The genesis of monastic libraries.Libraries & the Cultural Record,45(3), 320-332. doi:10.1353/lac.2010.0001. p.321)

“Without Enlightenment there might still be libraries, but without libraries there can be no Enlightenment.” (Bivens-Tatum, Wayne. (2012) Libraries and the Enlightenment. Los Angeles: Library-Juice Press. p.45)

“Educate your people to think in terms of their contributions. That is the only way one can make the professional staff . do professional work of quality which both satisfies them and makes them productive. It is also the only way you have to assuage what is your biggest problem; namely, that the library is a place where an incredible amount of donkey work goes on, and there’s no getting away from it. Everybody thinks a library is a place where deep thoughts float around. What floats around is mostly dust. A library is above all a continuous attempt to impose a little order on chaos. Information is basically chaotic, and in order to make it usable you have to have some order, and that requires a great deal of donkey work. In addition, all users leave disorder in their wake because they are not concerned with costs but only with their own needs; and it takes donkey work to keep things in order.” (Drucker, P.F. (1976). Managing the public service institution. College and Research Libraries 37(1), 12)

“If we had only to know books and fill our shelves with them, our work would be easy. On the other side of the desk are no the Public, but People, the most interesting thing in this world of ours; People, with all their hopes, their complexities, their diversities, all ages, many races, crowding all parts of our libraries, but each person having the thought, the powers, and the dignity given him by the Creator.” (Wyer, Malcolm G. “Enduring Values.” Bulletin of the American Library Association 31, no. 7 (1937): p.383)

The “academic library is like a nagging mother who reminds them of all that they have not, but probably should have, read.” (Sievert et al., 1989 Mary Ellen C. Sievert, David E. Sievert, Anne G. Edwards Scholarly needs and library resources: The case of philosophers. Final report of Grant 8011, Council on Library Resources, Washington, DC (1989) p.82)

“A University being a collection of schools, where all the parts of human knowledge are studied and taught, it is right that the library should stand in the center as the common treasure from which all the students have to draw and to which all have to refer.” (Fr. A. Orban S.S. Annual Report of the Rector of The Catholic University of America. Washington, D.C.: The Church News Publishing Co. 1894. p.27)

“Historically, libraries have manifested themselves in relation to their perceived contemporary purpose: as a symbol of democracy and freedom; temple of learning and advocate of civilization and high culture; university of the common man; a place of collective memory; or as social and civic space.” (Carroll, Mary, and Sue Reynolds. 2014. “There and Back Again”: Reimagining the public library for the twenty-first century. Library Trends 62 (3): 581-82)

Life

“Having once tasted life, we are subjected to the impulse of self-preservation. Life, in other words, is as habit-forming as cocaine.” (Lewis, C.S.. Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life. Boston: Mariner Books, 1966. p. 116)

Listening

One of the best ways to persuade others is with your ears- by listening to them. ~Dean Rusk

Love

“You cannot love without intuition.” (Graham Greene. The Quiet American. New York: The Viking Press. 1956. p.13)

“To be in love is to see yourself as someone else sees you, it is to be in love with the falsified and exalted image of yourself. In love we are incapable of honour- the courageous act is no more than playing a part to an audience of two.” (Graham Greene. The Quiet American. New York: The Viking Press. 1956. pp. 143-144)

Male/Female

“Sure, you could make generalizations about men and women, what they tended to do and want, buy and consume, but all of that was really just frosting, and it wasn’t until you got down deep inside the individual that you began to see the contradictions emerge and announce themselves. The concept of either/or isn’t very helpful when you’re trying to understand men and women, because every time you try to boil them down to their dirty habits, their anomalies poke through and leave you with a mess you can’t write up very neatly in a conclusion, except to say that both are true and neither.” (Vincent, Norah.  Self-Made Man : One Woman’s Journey Into Manhood And Back Again. New York : Viking, 2006. pp.117-118)

“This is not a book about women. It is a book for and about women and men. Its message is simple- so simple that in a few years it may be a puzzle why anyone should have bothered to make a case for it: Men and women are different. In their difference they need each other. The human race needs them both.” (Davidson, Nicholas. The Failure of Feminism. New York: Prometheus Books, 1988. p.1)

“Manhood is a leaden mythology riding on the shoulders of every man.” (Vincent, Norah.  Self-Made Man : One Woman’s Journey Into Manhood And Back Again. New York : Viking, 2006. p.271)

Maps

“To a chicken the object called a map is of no value as a map, but to humans capable of understanding their symbolization, maps and images convey information of greater or lesser importance depending on the needs and comprehension of the viewer.” (Thrower, N. J. W.(2007). Maps & Civilization: Cartography in Culture and Society (3rd ed.). Chicago: University of Chicago Press. p. 186)

“Not only is it easy to lie with maps, it’s essential. To portray meaningful relationships for a complex, three-dimensional world on a flat sheet of paper or a video screen, a map must distort reality. As a scale model, the map must use symbols that almost always are proportionally much bigger or thicker than the features they represent. To avoid hiding critical information in  fog of detail, the map must offer a selective, incomplete view of reality. There’s no escape from the cartographic paradox: to present a useful and truthful picture, an accurate map must tell white lies.” (Monmonier, Mark S. How to Lie with Maps. 2nd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996. p.1)

“Map projections distort five geographic relationships: areas, angles, gorss shapes, distances, and directions. Although some projections preserve local angels but not areas, others preserve areas but not local angles. All distort large shapes noticeably (but some distort continental shapes more than others), and all distort at least some distances and some directions.”(Monmonier, Mark S. How to Lie with Maps. 2nd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996. p.15-16)

“A good map tells a multitude of little white lies; it suppresses truth to help the user see what needs to be seen. Reality is three-dimensional, rich in detail, and far too factual to allow a complete yet uncluttered two-dimensional graphic scale model. Indeed, a map that did not generalize would be useless. But the value of a map depends on how well its generalized geometry and generalized content reflect a chosen aspect of reality.” (Monmonier, Mark S. How to Lie with Maps. 2nd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996. p.25)

“Like guns and lacrosse sticks, maps can be good or bad, depending on who’s holding them, who they’re aimed at, how they’re used, and why.” (Monmonier, Mark S. How to Lie with Maps. 2nd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996. p.112)

Manners

“The manners of a people are not to be found in the schools of learning, or the palaces of greatness, where the national character is obscured or obliterated by travel or instruction, by philosophy or vanity; nor is public happiness to be estimated by the assemblies of the gay, or the banquets of the rich. The great mass of nations is neither rich nor gay: they  whose aggregate constitutes the people, are found in the streets, and the villages, in the shops and farms.” (Johnson, Samuel. A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland , ed. R. W. Chapman (1775; reprint London, 1924), 18-20.)(Find the original edition in full  here.)

Marxism

“This claim to the status of scientific truth was one of Marxism’s greatest strengths. Certainly it was one of the main reasons it triumphed over all the other schools of radical thought with which it had to compete in the nineteenth century- schools Marx himself contemptuously dismissed as ‘utopian’ and ‘infantile.’ On the other hand, the scientific pretensions of Marxism also turned out to be a great weakness. A scientific theory, after all, is always in danger of being refuted or superseded by the discovery of new evidence or by the failure of its predictions to come true. And that is exactly what happened to Marxism. Marx predicted that the plight of the working class under capitalism would get worse and worse; but it grew better and better. He predicted that the socialist revolution would break out in one of the advanced industrial countries, probably Germany; but it broke out in a backward country, Russia. He predicted that out of this revolution would come a society of true freedom and equality; but it created on of the most monstrous tyrannies in human history. For me all this meant that Marxism had to be rejected. And rejecting Marxism for all practical purposes meant rejecting radicalism in general.” (Norman Podhoretz. Breaking Ranks: A Political Memoir. New York: Harper & Row, 1979. pp.45-46)

“From the mere standpoint of being on the inside of history, a Marxist has an immeasurable advantage over everybody else.” (Chrichton, Kyle (pseud. Robert Forsythe). “Speaking of the Dance,” New Masses, XII (July 24, 1934), 29)

“The ultimate responsibility of the Communists was not to unlimited discussion and analysis but to an ideology which in their view made greater moral demands than those  normally asked of the ‘independent’ intellectual in America. They saw their function primarily as one of publicizing and clarifying the programs of a political party and social class rather than debating theories and re-examining first principles regardless of the consequences. Their essays and books were consciously designed to persuade the doubters, convert the unaffiliated, and exemplify commitment to the uncommitted. Thus they tended to ‘use’ ideas not so much as rational explanations of empirical phenomena but more often as convenient weapons in a battle for the emotions and loyalties of the masses, emphasizing whatever arguments and concepts might sound convincing at the moment. The inherent truth or falsity of a position mattered less than its effectiveness in advancing socialist aims. Yet in an age of frightening uncertainty, when the virtues of detachment and skepticism appeared both anachronistic and dangerous, when the very autonomy of culture and thought was being severely challenged, the Communists’ willingness to subordinate the life of the mind to the pressures of politics and society seemed somehow appropriate.” ( Pells, Richard H . Radical Visions and American Dreams: Culture and Social Thought in the Depression Years. Urbana [u.a.] : University of Illinois Press, 1998. p.175)

Memory

“‘What power preserves what once was, if memory does not last?’ These words from the Lithuanian poet Czeslaw Milosz kept coming to mind as I was writing this book. The past doesn’t vanish at once; it dies slowly. But if remembered, the dead maintain their ground and live among us.” (Wilken, Robert Louis. 2012. The First Thousand Years: A Global History of Christianity. p.1)

“The choice to train one’s memory, or not, for the ancients and medievals, was not a choice dictated by convenience: it was a matter of ethics. A person without a memory, if such a thing could be, would be a person without moral character and, in a basic sense, without humanity. Memoria refers not to how something is communicated, but to what happens once on has received it, to the interactive process of familiarizing- or textualizing- which occurs between oneself and others’ words in memory.” (Mary Carruthers, The Book of Memory: A Study of Memory in Medieval Culture (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990) p.13)

“There is no identity without memory. If we do not remember what we are, we don’t know what we are. Over the centuries, we’ve seen that when a group or nation attempts to subjugate another group or nation, the first thing they do is erase the traces of its memory in order to reconfigure its identity.” (Báez, Fernando. (2008) A Universal History of the Destruction of Books. New York : Atlas & Co.: Distributed to the trade by W.W. Norton. p.12)

…”And sometimes remembering will lead to a story, which makes it forever. That’s what stories are for. Stories are for joining the past to the future. Stories are for those late hours in the night when you can’t remember how you got from where you were to where you are. Stories are for eternity, when memory is erased, when there is nothing to remember except the story.” (O’Brien, Tim. The Things They Carried. New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books, 1991. p.40)

Speaking about a colleague who had a tendency for exaggeration: “For Rat Kiley, I think, facts were formed by sensation, not the other way around, and when you listened to one of his stories, you’d find yourself performing rapid calculations in your head, subtracting superlatives, figuring the square root of an absolute and then multiplying by maybe.” (O’Brien, Tim. The Things They Carried. New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books, 1991. p.101)

“The thing about a story is that you dream it as you tell it, hoping that others might then dream along with you, and in this way memory and imagination and language combine to make spirits in the head. There is the illusion of aliveness.” (O’Brien, Tim. The Things They Carried. New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books, 1991. pp. 259-260)

Money

“No matter what budget format you use, you have to be able to answer this question: how do I spend my money? If you can not answer this question then you are not using your budget effectively.” (Gitelle Seer, (2000) “Special library financial management: the essentials of library budgeting“, The Bottom Line, Vol. 13 Iss: 4, p. 192)

Nature

“Nature recks nothing of intentions, good or bad; the one thing she will not tolerate is disorder, and she is very particular about getting her full pay for any attempt to create disorder. She gets it sometimes by very indirect methods, often by very roundabout and unforeseen ways, but she always gets it.” (Nock, Albert Jay. Our Enemy, The State. New York: Arno Press & The New York Times, 1972. pp.197-198)

Negotiating

“More seriously, pursuing a soft and friendly form of positional bargaining makes you vulnerable to someone who plays a hard game of positional bargaining. In positional bargaining, a hard game dominates a soft one. If the hard bargained insists on concessions and makes threats while the soft bargained yields in order to avoid confrontation and insists on agreement, the negotiating game is biased in favor of the hard player. The process  will produce an agreement, although it may not be a wise one. It will certainly be more favorable to the hard positional bargained than to the soft one. If your response to sustained, hard positional bargaining is soft positional bargaining, you will probably lose your shirt. (Fisher. R, Uri, W. (2011). Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In. New York: Penguin Books. p.10)

“In a negotiation, particularly in a bitter dispute, feelings may be more important than talk. The parties may be more ready for battle than for cooperatively working out a solution to a common problem. People often come to a negotiation realizing that the stakes are high and feeling threatened. Emotions on one side will generate emotions on the other. Fear may breed anger, and anger, fear. Emotions may quickly bring a negotiation to an impasse or an end.” (Fisher. R, Uri, W. (2011). Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In. New York: Penguin Books. p.31)

Objective/Subjective

“Objectivity, we might all agree, is a mental disposition to conceive of things realistically, a disposition inherent partly in the will and partly in an ability to observe, remember, and reason correctly. The opposite of objectivity would, then, be a mental disposition to conceive of things unrealistically; but, clearly, this is not an adequate definition of subjectivity. As generally understood, subjectivity implies, rather, a mental disposition to conceive of things with reference to oneself-that is to say, either as they appear to one personally, or as they affect or may be affected by one’s personal interests and desires.” (Wright, John K. “Terrae Incognitae: The Place of the Imagination in Geography..” Annals Of The Association Of American Geographers 37, no. 1 (March 1947): 5)

The Other

“When you do separate strategies from purpose, new options become possible. By releasing your grip on your strategy and focusing on your real purpose, you’re now open to the idea that you might actually find alternatives that can serve both of your interests.” (Patterson, K., Grenny, J., McMillan, R, & Swiltzler, A. (2012). Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High. (2nd Ed.) New York: McGraw Hill. p.93)

“Knowing the other side personally really does help. It is much easier to attribute diabolical intentions to an unknown abstraction called the ‘other side’ than to someone you know personally.” (Fisher. R, Uri, W. (2011). Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In. New York: Penguin Books. p.39)

“Just after we observe what others do and just before we feel some emotion about it, we tell ourselves a story. We add meaning to the action we observed. We make a guess at the motive driving the behavior. Why were they doing that? We also add judgment- is that good or bad? And then, based on these thoughts or stories, our body responds with an emotion.”(Patterson, K., Grenny, J., McMillan, R, & Swiltzler, A. (2012). Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High. (2nd Ed.) New York: McGraw Hill. p.108)

“Empathy often replaces judgment, and depending upon how we’ve treated others, personal accountability replaces self-justification.” (Patterson, K., Grenny, J., McMillan, R, & Swiltzler, A. (2012). Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High. (2nd Ed.) New York: McGraw Hill. p.124)

Peace

“So let us not be petty when our cause is so great. Let us not quarrel amongst ourselves when our Nation’s future is at stake. Let us stand together with renewed confidence in our cause- united in our heritage of the past and our hopes for the future- and determined that this land we love shall lead all mankind into new frontiers of peace and abundance.” (Kennedy, John F. Public papers of the Presidents of the United States: John F. Kennedy; containing the public messages, speeches, and statements of the President, 1961-1963. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1962-64. p.898) (It should be noted that this is from a speech that the President intended to give on November 22, 1963, but was never given.)

Philosophy

“The history of philosophy and of all phases of man’s reflection is, in great part, a history of confusions of ideas; and the chapter of it with which we shall be occupied is no exception to this rule.” (Lovejoy, Arthur O.. The Great Chain of Being: A study of the History of an Idea. (New York, Harper & Row [1960, c1936]), p.23

Politics

“There is no more important task in a democracy than resolving the differences among people and finding a course of action that will be supported by a sufficient number to permit the nation to achieve a better life for all. That is both the challenge and the responsibility of the politician.” (McNamara. Robert S. (1995) In retrospect: the tragedy and lessons of Vietnam. New York : Times Books. p.123-124 )

“Economy was a sacred word useful in campaigns but forgotten when the party was in power.”(Hutzler, Helen C. 1963. History of Rome, Georgia Carnegie Library (1911-1961). Thesis (M.S. in L.S.)–Catholic University of America p.13)

In remembering a conversation the author had with Abraham Lincoln the author writes: “In regard to this story-telling, he said: ‘I am accused of telling a great many stories. They say that it lowers the dignity of the presidential office, but I have found that plain people (repeating with emphasis plain people), take them as you find them, are more easily influenced by a broad and humorous illustration than in any other way, and what the hypercritical few may think, I don’t care.'” (Depew, Chauncey Mitchell. (1924). My Memories of Eighty Years. New York: C. Scribner’s Sons. p.57)

“Identifying institutions and structures is essential, but it is equally essential to remember that unless institutions and structures have meaning for individuals, they do not survive.”(Kloppenberg, James T., “Deliberative Democracy and Poverty in America,” in The Virtues of Liberalism 1998, ed. James T. Kloppenberg (New York : Oxford University Press, 1998), 115)

Power

“POWER, the basic energy to initiate and sustain action translating intention into reality, the quality without which leaders cannot lead … power is at once the most necessary and the most distrusted element exigent to human progress…power is the basic energy needed to initiate and sustain action or, to put it another way, the capacity to translate intention into reality and sustain it.” (Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus, Leaders: The Strategies for Taking Charge (New York, NY: Harper and Row, 1985), pp.15-17

“Power is defined here as the potential ability to influence behavior, to change the course of events, to overcome resistance, and to get people to do things that they would not otherwise do. Politics and influence are the processes, the actions, the behaviors through which this potential power is utilized and realized.” (Pfeffer, J. (1992). Understanding power in organizations. California Management Review, 34(2), 45)

“Power is the opportunity to build, to create, to nudge history in a different direction. There are few satisfactions to match it for those who care about such things. But it is not happiness. Those who seek happiness will not acquire power and would not use it well if they did acquire it.” (Richared M. Nixon, Leaders (New York, NY: Warner Books, 1982), p.324

Speaking of Robert Lovett, “He was the private man in the public society par excellence. He did not need to impress people with  false images. He knew the rules of the game: to whom you talked, what you said, to whom you did not talk, which journalists were your kind, would, without being told, know what to print for the greater good, which questions to ask, and which questions not to ask. He lived in a world where young men made their way up the ladder by virtue not just of their own brilliance and ability but also of who their parents were, which phone calls from which old friends had preceded their appearance in an office. In a world like this he know that those whose names were always in print, who were always on the radio and television, were there precisely because they did not have power, that those who did hold or had access to power tried to keep out of sight He was a twentieth-century man who did not hold press conferences, who never ran for anything. The classic insider’s man.” (Halberstam, David. The Best and the Brightest (New York: Random House, 1972), p.5

“It is interesting that when we use power ourselves, we see it as a good force and wish we had more. When others use it against us, particularly when it is used to thwart our goals or ambitions, we see it as an evil. A more sophisticated and realistic view would see it for what it is – an important social process that is often required to get things accomplished in interdependent systems.” (Pfeffer, J. (1992). Understanding power in organizations. California Management Review, 34(2), 35)

…”the chief power in the affairs of this world is not unlikely to fall, or to be forced, into the hands of those who have withdrawn from it.” (Lovejoy, Arthur O.. The Great Chain of Being: A study of the History of an Idea. (New York, Harper & Row [1960, c1936]), p.27

“Knowledge without power is of remarkably little use. And power without the skill to employ it effectively is likely to be wasted.” (Pfeffer, J. (1992). Understanding power in organizations. California Management Review, 34(2), 47)

Republic

“Republicanism permits the individual to persuade himself that the State is his creation, that State action is his action, that when it expresses itself it expresses him, and when it is glorified he is glorified.” (Nock, Albert Jay. Our Enemy, The State. New York: Arno Press & The New York Times, 1972. p.57)

Research

“In research, we build a firewall against entropic forays … by starting with a thesis, or sets of theses, that pull our attention and imagination back into orbit around what matters. We start, in a sense, with a story, and we refine and redirect it as required by data we discover.” The spatial humanities: GIS and the future of humanities scholarship 2010. , eds. David J. Bodenhamer, J. Corrigan and Trevor M. Harris. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. p. 84

filtration of irrelevant information  and condensation of relevant information are the two information services most sorely needed by managers. Studies have shown that even good scientific writing can be reduced by two-thirds without loss of content, and that bad scientific writing can be reduced by one-hundred percent without loss of content.” (Ackoff, R.L.(1989). From Data to Wisdom. Journal of applied systems analysis, 16, 4.)

Revolution

Revolutions “are incited by abuses and misfeasances, more or less specific and always secondary, and are carried on with no idea beyond getting them rectified or avenged, usually by the sacrifice of conspicuous scapegoats.” (Nock, Albert Jay. Our Enemy, The State. New York: Arno Press & The New York Times, 1972. p.133)

all revolutionary artists aiming to undermine the ideological structure of the middle class and consolidate the working class must, in order to be at this time effectively heard, consider seriously the question of working through Hollywood.” (Gessner, Robert. “Massacre in Hollywood.” New Theatre and Film, I. (March 1934), 17. cited in Pells, Richard H . Radical Visions and American Dreams: Culture and Social Thought in the Depression Years. Urbana [u.a.] : University of Illinois Press, 1998. p.264)

Science

“Natural science, like any form of inquiry, is a human affair; it cannot exist apart from cultural values any more than social science can.” (Kloppenberg, James T., “Democracy and Disenchantment,” in The Virtues of Liberalism 1998, ed. James T. Kloppenberg (New York : Oxford University Press, 1998), 86)

Socialism

“It was, of course, a cliché that socialism had served as a substitute for religion in the hearts of many of its adherents; like religion, it rewarded the faithful with a transcendent cause to which they could selflessly devote themselves and from which they could derive a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives. And since, like religion too, it depended ultimately upon faith rather than reason for its validation, it could survive the refutation of its claims by argument and evidence. The most extreme case was the Communists of the pre-Khrushchev period, who stubbornly continued to insist, against all reason and all the evidence, on the benign character of Stalin’s regime. They were the secular equivalent of the early Christian theologian who declared that he believed in the Resurrection because it seemed absurd to the rational mind.”(Norman Podhoretz. Breaking Ranks: A Political Memoir. New York: Harper & Row, 1979. p.63)

Society

“God having designed Man for a sociable Creature, made him not only with an inclination, and under a necessity to have fellowship with those of his own kind; but furnished him also with Language, which was to be the great Instrument and common Tye of Society.” (Locke, John. (1690). An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. London: Thomas Basset p.185)

Space & Time

“Spaces are not simply the setting for historical action but are a significant product and determinant of change. They are not passive settings but the medium for the development of a culture.” The spatial humanities: GIS and the future of humanities scholarship 2010. , eds. David J. Bodenhamer, J. Corrigan and Trevor M. Harris. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. p. 16

“The supply of time is totally inelastic. No matter how high the demand, the supply will not increase. There is no price for it and no marginal utility curve for it. Moreover, time is totally perishable and cannot be stored. Yesterday’s time is gone forever and will never come back. Time is, therefore, always in exceedingly short supply.” (Drucker, P.F. (2001). The Essential Drucker. New York: HarperCollins. p.226)

“while time flows from an infinite past to an infinite future, space on the Earth’s surface is fundamentally finite.” The spatial humanities: GIS and the future of humanities scholarship 2010. , eds. David J. Bodenhamer, J. Corrigan and Trevor M. Harris. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. p. 61

“in an ideal world we would use spatial and temporal data to explore how a phnomenon has evolved over time, not by comparing two snapshots but by looking at continuous change. In doing so the aim is not to identify the story of how teh process evolved but to use different places to explore the different ways in which the phenomenon could occur differently.”  The spatial humanities: GIS and the future of humanities scholarship 2010. , eds. David J. Bodenhamer, J. Corrigan and Trevor M. Harris. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. p. 66

Tariff

“We all now know pretty well, probably, that the primary reason for a tariff is that it enables the exploitation of the domestic consumer by a process indistinguishable from sheer robbery.” (Nock, Albert Jay. Our Enemy, The State. New York: Arno Press & The New York Times, 1972. p.125)

Truth

“When, however, it judges that a thing corresponds to the form which it apprehends about that thing, then first it knows and expresses truth. This it does by composing and dividing: for in every proposition it either applies to, or removes from the thing signified by the subject, some form signified by the predicate: and this clearly shows that the sense is true of any thing, as is also the intellect, when it knows “what a thing is”; but it does not thereby know or affirm truth.” (Aquinas, Summa Theologica 1.16.2)

War

“It was my view then, and still is, that you don’t make war without knowing why. Knowledge, of course is always imperfect, but it seemed to me that when a nation goes to war it must have reasonable confidence in the justice and imperative of its cause. You can’t fix your mistakes. Once people are dead, you can’t make them undead.” (O’Brien, Tim. The Things They Carried. New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books, 1991. p.44)

“In war more than in other life you don’t really know what you’re doing most of the time, you’re just behaving, and afterward you can make up any kind of bullshit you want to about it, say you felt good or bad, loved it or hated it, did this or that, the right thing or the wrong thing; still, what happened happened.” (Herr, Michael. (1978). Dispatches. New York: Alfred A Knopf. p. 20-21)

“There should be a law, I thought. If you support a war, if you think it’s worth the price, that’s fine, but you have to put your own precious fluids on the line.”  (O’Brien, Tim. The Things They Carried. New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books, 1991. p.45)

“War, a cheap form of mass tourism, opens the mind to business opportunities.”  (McCarthy, Mary. (1967). Vietnam. New York, Harcourt, Brace & World, p.23)

“To destroy is to assume the symbolic act of death by negating what is represented.”(Báez, Fernando. (2008) A Universal History of the Destruction of Books. New York : Atlas & Co.: Distributed to the trade by W.W. Norton. p.10)

“Wars generate their own momentum and follow the law of unanticipated consequences.” (McNamara, Robert S. (1995) In retrospect: the tragedy and lessons of Vietnam. New York : Times Books. p.174 )

“When timber ran low during the Roman siege of Athens, Sulla ravaged the wooded areas of the Academy and the Lyceum (Plutarch, Sulla 14); while we do not hear of any damage to buildings owned or used by the schools, the devastation of the sacred groves must have been a visible reminder to the philosophers of the hazards of war.” (Dix, T. Keith. (2004). Aristotle’s ‘Peripatetic’ Library. In Raven, James (Ed.), Lost Libraries: The Destruction of Great Book Collections since Antiquity. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. p.67)

“An aging Chinese wearing a priest’s robes and a steel helmet and pistol belt is a strange study in contrasts, but the combination worked.” (Browne, Malcom W. (1998). Massacre in the Ca Mau Peninsula: February 1962. In Reporting Vietnam: Part One (p.36). New York: Literary Classics of the United States.)

“In the field, moreover, the war is not questioned; it is just a fact.” (McCarthy, Mary. (1967). Vietnam. New York, Harcourt, Brace & World, p.10)

“Somewhere on the periphery of that total Vietnam issue whose daily reports made the morning papers too heavy to bear, lost in the surreal contexts of television, there was a story that was as simple as it had always been, men hunting men, a hideous war and all kinds of victims.” (Herr, Michael. (1978). Dispatches. New York: Alfred A Knopf. p. 214)

“To suggest that military leaders want war is to misunderstand what motivates them….I never forgot that [the Joint Chiefs]- and the soldiers, sailors, and airmen of all ranks they commanded- were motivated by a deep and noble desire to serve their country, and a willingness to sacrifice their lives if necessary to achieve that end.” (McNamara. Robert S. (1995) In retrospect: the tragedy and lessons of Vietnam. New York : Times Books. p.176 (footnote) )

“For the most part they carried themselves with poise, a kind of dignity. Now and then, however, there were times of panic, when they squealed or wanted to squeal but couldn’t, when they twitched and made moaning sounds and covered their heads and said Dear Jesus and flopped around on the earth and fired their weapons blindly and cringed and sobbed and begged for the noise to stop and went wild and made stupid promises to themselves and to God and to their mothers and fathers, hoping not to die. In different ways, it happened to all of them. Afterward, when the firing ended, they would blink and peek up. They would touch their bodies, feeling shame, then quickly hiding it. They would force themselves to stand. As if in slow motion, frame by frame, the world would take on the old logic – absolute silence, then the wind, then sunlight, then voices. It was the burden of being alive. Awkwardly, the men would reassemble themselves, first in private, then in groups, becoming soldiers again.” (O’Brien, Tim. The Things They Carried. New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books, 1991. pp. 18-19)

Regarding the destruction of libraries, museums, artifacts, etc. that happened during the early days of the Iraq war, “Why should this murder of memory occurred in the place where the book was born?” (Báez, Fernando. (2008) A Universal History of the Destruction of Books. New York : Atlas & Co.: Distributed to the trade by W.W. Norton. p.3)

“To carry something was to hump it, as when Lieutenant Jimmy Cross humped his love for Martha up the hills and through the swamps. In its intransitive form, to hump meant to walk, or to march, but it implied burdens far beyond the intransitive.” (O’Brien, Tim. The Things They Carried. New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books, 1991. p.5)

“It became clear then, and I believe it is clear today, that military force – especially when wielded by an outside power- just cannot bring order in a country that cannot govern itself.” (McNamara, Robert S. (1995) In retrospect: the tragedy and lessons of Vietnam. New York : Times Books. p.261 )

“Some carried all they could bear, and then some, including a silent awe for the terrible power of the things they carried.” (O’Brien, Tim. The Things They Carried. New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books, 1991. p.9)

“The war of the future would be one in which man could extinguish millions of lives at one blow, demolish the great cities of the world, wipe out the cultural achievements of the past- and destroy the very structure of a civilization that has been slowly and painfully built up through hundreds of generations. Such a war is not a possible policy for rational men.” (Harry S. Truman, “Annual Message to the Congress on the State of the Union,” January 7, 1953, The American Presidency Project)

“War is hell, but that’s not the half of it, because war is also mystery and terror and adventure and courage and discovery and holiness and pity and despair and longing and love. War is nasty; war is fun. War is thrilling; war is drudgery. War makes you a man; war makes you dead.” (O’Brien, Tim. The Things They Carried. New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books, 1991. pp.86-87)

Work

“No, I don’t like work. I had rather laze about and think of all the fine things that can be done. I don’t like work – no man does- but I like what is in the work – the chance to find yourself. Your own reality -for yourself, not for others – what no other man can ever know. They can only see the mere show, and never can tell what it really means.” (Spoken by Marlow in Conrad, J.  (2011). Heart of darkness: Complete, authoritative text with biographical, historical, and cultural contexts, critical history, and essays from contemporary critical perspectives (3rd ed.) R. C. Murfin (Ed.). Boston: Bedford-St. Martins. p.44)

Writing

“‘What power preserves what once was, if memory does not last?’ These words from the Lithuanian poet Czeslaw Milosz kept coming to mind as I was writing this book. The past doesn’t vanish at once; it dies slowly. But if remembered, the dead maintain their ground and live among us.” (Wilken, Robert Louis. 2012. The First Thousand Years: A Global History of Christianity. p.1)

“The general reason is that when in any department of thought a person has, or things he has, a view of the plain intelligible order of things, it is proper that he should record that view publicly, with no thought whatever of the practical consequences, or lack of consequences, likely to ensue upon his so doing. He might indeed be thought bound to do this as a matter of abstract duty; not to crusade or propagandize for his view or seek to impose it upon anyone-far from that!- not to concern himself at all with either its acceptance or its disallowance; but merely to record it. This I say, might be though his duty to the natural truth of things, but in is at all events his right; it is admissible.” (Nock, Albert Jay. Our Enemy, The State. New York: Arno Press & The New York Times, 1972. p.208)

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